Friday, 2 December 2011

Russian Classics Showcased at IFFI

At the 42nd International Film Festival of India in Goa, a number of Russian classics are being showcased. The films cover a large spectrum; from comedies, musicals, war films to strong authorial cinemas. The film ‘1814’ directed by Andres Puustusmaa is a murder mystery woven around a group of six high school students. An unknown maniac is out killing young women mutilating their bodies with a strange weapon. One of the students witnesses one such crime and the gang decides to solve the mystery. On the other hand, ‘Come and See’ shows the horror of World War II through the eyes of a 13 year old peasant boy. It very sensitively portrays the ill- effects of war, the destruction and death and the vengeance evoked in the heart of the young boy. The ‘Day of the Full Moon’ directed by Karen Shakhnazarov offers a broad look at modern life in the troubled former Soviet Union. It narrates the story of an actor named Oleg, whose neighbor, Arnold has lured his wife away. The film ‘The Mirror’ directed by Andrei Tarkovsky is considered to be his most autobiographical work. It depicts the thoughts and emotions of protagonist Alexei and the world surrounding him. The structure of the film is discontinuous and non-chronological, without a conventional plot and combines childhood memories with newsreel footage. The film switches between three different time frames: pre-war, war time and the post war 1960s. The film won the Special Jury prize at Cannes. ‘Truce’ directed by Svetlana Proskurina shows the anonymous Russian countryside in loose sketches as a surrealistic world in which threat, conflict and violence are a part of everyday life. The film participated in the Kinotavr Open Russian Film Festival 2011 and International Film Festival Rotterdam, 2011. Another film in the Russian treat is ‘Uncle Vanya’ directed by Andrei Konchalovsky. It is the story of a retired professor who returns to his estate to live with his beautiful young wife, Yelena. ...

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